NASA spots most Earth-like planet yet

first_imgNASA’s prolific exoplanets-hunting satellite Kepler has found its strongest candidate yet for an Earth-like planet in a life-friendly orbit around a sunlike star. Known as Kepler 452b, the world is estimated to be a bit on the hefty side, at five times the mass of Earth, but it is receiving just 10% more heat and light than we do from its G-type star, just like our sun but 1.5 billion years older. “It would feel a lot like home in terms of the sunshine you would experience,” says Jon Jenkins, who leads Kepler data analysis at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. “This is the closest we have … to another place someone might call home.”The discovery of Kepler 452b was announced today along with the latest edition of Kepler’s catalog of exoplanet candidates, adding 500 new possible planets for a total of 4175. Kepler detects exoplanets by staring continually at 150,000 stars and recording their brightness for long periods. If the brightness of a star dips slightly for a while and then recovers, that could be the sign of an orbiting planet passing in front of it.Other things can also cause brightness fluctuations, so all Kepler candidates must be confirmed either by other sorts of observations or more detailed statistical analysis of the Kepler data. “Confirmation is very time consuming,” says Jeff Coughlin, Kepler research scientist at SETI Institute in Mountain View, California. As a result, the Kepler team has automated the confirmation process for this latest catalog. The results are beginning to show that small rocky planets are the most common of all planet types in the catalog, making up as much as 25%. “The numbers are increasing exponentially,” Coughlin says. Kepler operated from 2009 to 2013 when it was hobbled by the failure of stabilizing reaction wheels. It is continuing to make observations at reduced capacity.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Among the new additions to the catalog are several small, probably rocky planets that reside in the habitable zone—at a distance from their star that allows liquid water to exist on their surface. These newcomers bring the total number of small habitable-zone planets discovered by Kepler to 12. What makes Kepler 452b different is the star it is orbiting. Four of the 12 orbit around M-stars, which are considerably smaller and dimmer than our sun. Seven orbit K-stars, which are a bit more like the sun. But Kepler 452b is the first found around a G-star, the same sort as our sun. “We’ve made amazing progress at finding the right-sized planets, in the right-sized orbits, around the right-sized stars,” Jenkins says.Kepler 452b is 1400 light-years from Earth, orbits its star every 385 days, and is 1.6 times the diameter of Earth. Transit measurements don’t give any information about mass, but, judging from similar exoplanets for which masses are known, the Kepler team estimates it is five times as heavy as Earth, so any visitor would feel twice the gravity we are used to at home. The team consulted planetary geologists about what conditions there may be like, and they predicted that it would likely have experienced active volcanos for some time. Its higher mass may give it a thicker atmosphere and more cloud cover than Earth has. The greater age of the star means it will be heating up, so Kepler 452b may be experiencing a runaway greenhouse effect similar to the one that is currently toasting Venus. However, because of its size and distance, it is unlikely that we will find out more about Kepler 452b for a considerable time, if ever.This is “a fascinating new step forward,” says Didier Queloz of the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, who, along with Michel Mayor, made the first observations of an exoplanet around a normal star. And it comes in the year of the 20th anniversary of that first discovery. “This is a great time we are living in. We now know that there are planets around almost all stars,” he says. “If we keep working as well [as we are now], we can be sure the issue of finding life on another planet will be solved.”last_img read more

People on the move: The science of migrations

first_img Science can also aid the 21 million migrants today who are refugees from violence or famine, according to the United Nations. They need food, medicine, and shelter now, but in the long run it is their mental health that will be key to building new lives, as shown by a case study of the long-persecuted Yezidis. How can we blunt prejudice against immigrants? Vast set of public CVs reveals the world’s most migratory scientists Migration—the choices we face Busting myths of origin Science helps us think more clearly about migration, in part by showing its deep roots. Researchers wielding powerful new methods have discovered ancient, hidden migrations that shaped today’s populations. Go back far enough and almost all of us are immigrants, despite cherished stories of ethnic and national origins.  Restless minds More from our special package The success of these and other immigrants depends in part on whether new countries spurn or welcome them, and research is starting to show how to manage our long-standing biases against outsiders. Giving refugees a chance Crossing borders along an endless frontier People on the move: The science of migrationscenter_img Battling bias Today, more people live outside the country of their birth than ever before—nearly 250 million, or 3% of the world’s population. That’s up from 79 million in 1960, and the rising tide is a challenge for locals as well as for migrants themselves. Cover stories: Visualizing scientist migrations There’s no such thing as a ‘pure’ European—or anyone else More from our special package: Human migrations Migration today: Displaced scientists The pain of exile By Elizabeth CulottaMay. 19, 2017 , 9:00 AM Science itself is one of the more itinerant professions, with many scientists crossing borders in search of opportunity. They are surprisingly hard to track, but a set of online records offers an unexpected way to find the most migratory among them. Their spirit of adventure suggests that as the world continues to shrink, the impulse to move is unlikely to fade. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Surviving genocide: Storytelling and ritual help communities heallast_img read more

Liberal promise to set strict rules for unpaid interns pushed to 2019

first_imgOTTAWA – Justin Trudeau’s Liberals won’t make good on their vow to crack down on unpaid internships until next year — almost four years after the issue first landed on the federal government’s agenda.In the 2017 budget, the Liberals promised to eliminate unpaid internships in federally regulated workplaces — the only exception being student placements required as part of a school course. Interns would be treated like regular employees, with the same work hours and under the same safety regulations.Officials now say it will be fall of 2019 — right when the next federal election is expected — when they unveil the final set of regulations, at which time those groups pushing for an end to unpaid internships will find out when the rules come into force.Cabinet will have the final say on when the rules come into effect.“Once the legislation was amended, most people assumed you couldn’t do this anymore,” said Hassan Yussuff, president of the Canadian Labour Congress.“I don’t know why they haven’t put forth the regulations on this because they were very clear. Immediately after they got elected, they acted on it.”Since coming to office, the Liberals have touted spending aimed at creating more jobs for young people — notably doubling funding for the Canada Summer Jobs program, and putting money into creating internships and apprenticeships — hoping to meet campaign promises that won over many young voters.NDP jobs critic Niki Ashton accused the Liberals of being “all talk and no action” on an issue of vital importance to young Canadians.“There’s no excuse for not making a change sooner.”The previous Conservative government promised changes to labour laws to protect unpaid interns as part of their 2015 budget, but the rules were never implemented.The Liberals revived the proposal in December 2015, weeks after taking office, and faced opposition to its plan to allow unpaid work for up to four months full-time or up to a year part-time. The Canadian Intern Association dropped out of consultations, students mounted protests and labour groups demanded the whole process be restarted.When Patty Hajdu became labour minister in early 2017, her mandate letter called for updating labour standards “to address emerging issues such as unpaid internships.”The government’s second budget bill last year deleted part of the Canada Labour Code that provided an allowance for unpaid internships in certain cases, but left an existing exception for educational placements intact.In a statement, Hajdu said the government was committed to consulting Canadians on the changes before they are implemented.“Young Canadians need meaningful work experience to start strong in their careers, but unpaid internships can be unfair and exploitative,” she said.“We will eliminate unpaid internships in federally regulated sectors where they are not part of a formal educational program during this mandate.”A new round of consultations is set to launch next month and run into the fall to coincide with talks about new unpaid leaves for family reasons, traditional Indigenous practices, and victims of family violence.“While we’re encouraged that the federal government is finally moving forward on addressing unpaid internships within federally regulated employers, we’re also concerned that the timelines are excessive and push any concrete action into 2019 or 2020,” said Andrew Langille, counsel for the Canadian Intern Association.“The commitment to tackle unpaid internships was made during the 2015 election and one would think four years would be enough time to tackle a straightforward regulatory change.”Ashton said some schools are avoiding unpaid internships for students. Even so, she said, some young people believe unpaid work is the only way they can get job experience and a foothold in the labour market.Last week’s latest jobs figures from Statistics Canada showed an 11.7 per cent unemployment rate for workers age 15 to 24 — almost twice the national average of six per cent and up from May’s rate of 11.1 per cent.— Follow @jpress on Twitterlast_img read more

Japan lifts evacuation in parts of Fukushima plant hometown

first_imgTokyo: Japan partially lifted an evacuation order in one of the two hometowns of the tsunami-wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant on Wednesday for the first time since the 2011 disaster. Decontamination efforts have lowered radiation levels significantly in the area about 7 kilometers (4 miles) southwest of the plant where three reactors had meltdowns due to the damage caused by the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami. The action allows people to return to about 40 percent of Okuma. The other hometown, Futaba, remains off-limits, as are several other towns nearby. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from USMany former residents are reluctant to return as the complicated process to safely decommission the plant continues. Opponents of lifting the evacuation orders in long-abandoned communities say the government is promoting residents’ return to showcase safety ahead of the Tokyo Olympics next summer. The government has pushed for an aggressive decontamination program by removing topsoil, chopping trees and washing down houses and roads in contaminated areas, though experts say the effort only caused the contamination to move from one place to another, creating massive amounts of radioactive waste and the need for its long-term storage. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential pollsThe meltdowns at three of Fukushima Dai-ichi’s six reactors caused massive radiation leaks that contaminated the plant’s surroundings, forcing at its peak some 160,000 people to evacuate their homes for areas elsewhere in Fukushima or outside the prefecture. Evacuation orders in most of the initial no-go zones have been lifted, but restrictions are still in place in several towns closest to the plant and to its northwest, which were contaminated by radioactive plumes from the plant soon after its meltdowns. More than 40,000 people were still unable to return home as of March, including Okuma’s population of 10,000. Town officials say the lifting of the evacuation order in the two districts would encourage the area’s recovery. “We are finally standing on a starting line of reconstruction,” Okuma mayor Toshitsuna Watanabe told reporters.last_img read more

Football Ohio States offensive process stays the same results improve

Redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) prepares to call a play in the third quarter against Nebraska in Memorial Stadium on Oct. 14. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorIn Ohio State’s home opening loss, the team averaged just 5.1 yards per play and scored only 16 points.Since then, the offense has averaged 7.8 yards per play and 53.2 points per game. Whether it be improved play, new personnel, different play-calling or some combination of the three, something would appear to have changed with the team.But to co-offensive coordinator Kevin Wilson, the difference in the production might be more attributed to improved chemistry rather than any other drastic changes to the team.“I felt earlier in the year when we struggled, we didn’t come into the game with momentum,” Wilson said. “I think we’ve came through each week with momentum. Now you’ve still got to execute on Saturdays, but I think we’re coming into the game with some confidence and some momentum during the week of practice.”With each win Ohio State has secured, the team seems to be clicking more as a cohesive group of players and finding more success in nearly everything it has tried. But why wasn’t the 49-21 win against Indiana enough to propel the Buckeyes into their clash against Oklahoma?Quarterback J.T. Barrett believes the key to building momentum does not come as much from practice as much as it does from executing plays in games. At the time of the Oklahoma game, the Buckeyes had played just one game and were still searching for their identity.“I think it’s interesting being that in college, we don’t have a preseason,” Barrett said. “In NFL preseason games, they get time to get going as far as actual game to football. We just try to do the best we can in practice. And everything doesn’t click in the first weeks of college football.”As far as changes to playcalling or improved execution of those plays, the Buckeyes believe they are right where they were at the beginning of the season. The only difference now is that they have had a chance to thoroughly knock some rust off and the individuals are now starting to play more like a team. “We’ve put it all together the way those groups can play,” Wilson said. “What we’re trying to sell right now, the more we play together, the more we play for each other, linemen stepping up, the second and third tight ends, second and third running backs, five, six, seven receivers. The more guys play, the more energy is. It grows, that chemistry.”Could it be that simple? Is the only key to beating a top-five opponent just having more chemistry on the team? Redshirt junior wide receiver Johnnie Dixon said it just might be. The starting wideout believes Ohio State’s improved play is a direct result of the team just connecting better with each other. He felt fine with how the team was preparing earlier in the season, even after it took its loss to Oklahoma. Now it’s just about everyone executing better.“I just feel like you approach every day the same,” Dixon said. “If you don’t approach the date being the best you can, you’re going to lose. Different opponents come, but it’s still the same thing week after week. You’ve still got to be at your best.”The Buckeyes will train to maintain the momentum and chemistry through the off week before its matchup against Penn State. read more

Football Urban Meyer praises Brendon White in Monday press conference

Ohio State did not have much secondary depth heading into the Nebraska game Saturday. The Buckeyes were without sophomore safety Isaiah Pryor, out with a shoulder impingement, and sophomore cornerback Jeffrey Okudah, out with a groin injury suffered during practice that week. Jordan Fuller did not do Ohio State any favors. The junior safety was ejected from the game in the second quarter after being called for targeting. But sophomore safety Brendon White gave head coach Urban Meyer some hope. He recorded 13 total tackles — two for loss.In his weekly press conference, Meyer would not go as far as to say White’s performance was “refreshing” for the Ohio State defense, noting he is not sure he has used that word in his life. But he said White’s performance was important, especially at a shaky position. “Going back to springtime, safety was not a solidified position. We have to play much better at that spot,” Meyer said. “You had some injuries this week. And obviously the targeting call. And there he is, he’s in the game. And looked out there, you had Shaun Wade at one safety and Brendon White at the other.” Meyer said after the game Saturday he expects Pryor and Okudah to be back for Michigan State. But, with White’s performance, the head coach said he has a decision to make: whether White earned a start even with a healthy secondary. Meyer said that answer will come in the next few days, but, nevertheless, the sophomore safety has earned playing time. “We’re going to find out. He’s certainly going to play. He’s earned that right. He’s practiced. That was coming,” Meyer said. “His practices have been very good the last couple of weeks and coach Grinch made that clear in front of the team after the game. But he’s certainly earned the right to be on the field.” Without a definite starter next to Fuller, Meyer said White will still have to earn the trust of the coaching staff. But after his performance against the Cornhuskers, White will have continued opportunities to grow into that role, Meyer said. Hartline picks up on the recruiting trailEven with the lack of stability with the Ohio State wide receivers heading into the 2018 season, with the firing of former wide receivers coach and recruiting coordinator Zach Smith, interim wide receivers coach Brian Hartline did not have time to learn the ropes of recruiting. However, in his new role, Hartline has continued the trend, securing a commitment from 2020 four-star wide receiver Jaxon Smith-Njigba. A Rockwall, Texas, native, Smith-Njigba is the No. 59 wide-receiver recruit in the country and the No. 36 recruit in the start, according to the 247Sports composite rankings. Along with Smith-Njigba, Hartline has helped keep five-star 2019 wide receiver Garrett Wilson, who was at the Nebraska game Saturday, committed to the Buckeyes even after Smith’s firing in July, and added a commitment from 2019 four-star wide receiver Jameson Williams in September. To Meyer, Hartline is doing a very good job in a role he was forced into. “He was thrust into a situation,” Meyer said. “And I think one of the great things he had, he had a veteran group to coach, and he has very good recruiters around here to see how it’s done. He’s been here a couple of years. That’s a positive.” Meyer has not confirmed whether Hartline’s title of interim coach will turn into a full-time role, saying he will “address it at the right time.” read more

Germany boss rules out Ozil comeback

first_imgGermany boss Joachim Low feels that it’s very unlikely that Mesut Ozil will ever retract his decision to retire from international footballThe Arsenal playmaker announced his retirement following Germany’s disastrous World Cup campaign that saw them eliminated at the group stages.Ozil cited German Football Federation (DFB) president Reinhard Grindel’s discrimination and “incompetence” as one of his main reasons for leaving the national side.The 29-year-old did suggest though that he may make a comeback if the “feeling of racism and disrespect” from the DFB disappears.But Low says his gone and that’s it.“In my view, Mesut Ozil has clearly declared his retirement and closed the door by himself with that, so a comeback is not a topic,” he told Sport Bild, via SportsKeeda.Top 5 Bundesliga players to watch during the weekend Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 11, 2019 With the international activity cooling down for the next month, we go back to the Bundesliga’s Top 5 players to watch next weekend.The German…Low revealed last week that he has not been able to talk to Ozil since his announcement.“Mesut did not call me, not to this very day,” he said.“I tried to reach him several times in the past two weeks, via text message, via phone. Mesut has decided to take this path. I must accept it.“Ozil has been my player for nine years. We’ve experienced a lot together. A few lows, but more highs. We’ve won the World Cup. This will still stay forever.“I am still of the opinion that he was one of the best players we had in Germany in the last 20, 30 years.“One day, we’ll have a conversation. I would have wished for him to inform me personally, and I was disappointed at first.”last_img read more

Veterans Would Receive Free Public Education under Massachusetts Bill

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR Legislation introduced in the Massachusetts House would eliminate any gaps in federal G.I. benefits allowing veterans to attend public colleges in the state for free.The bill, sponsored by Rep. James Arciero, is supported by dozens of lawmakers, but there are still questions about how much the proposal would cost the state. The bill would provide full coverage of all tuition and fees for any veteran who has served 90 days of active duty, reported the Lowell Sun.“I am proud that Massachusetts leads the nation in providing for veterans and their families and offers the most generous veterans’ benefits of any of the 50 states,” Arciero said in a statement. “We need to continue to strengthen our ability to care for our veterans and ensure all veterans in Massachusetts receive free public higher education.”The G.I. bill covers tuition and fees for Massachusetts veterans at colleges and universities, but time restrictions on when the benefits must be used and a sliding scale for the cost of education depending on how many years the veteran served leave gaps in coverage, according to Arciero.“While the G.I. bills lift the financial burden of the cost of higher education from most veterans, my legislation will ensure that no veteran will ever slip through the cracks,” Arciero said.A spokesman for the state Executive Office for Administration and Finance said it is too early to determine if it would be feasible to fund the bill in the state’s budget, according to the story.Last month Arciero testified before the Joint Committee on Veterans and Federal Affairs to support a favorable recommendation from the panel, which would move the bill to the Ways & Means Committee.last_img read more