Floridas Odds Are Dropping

Which NCAA team had the worst day on Thursday? The obvious answer might be Ohio State, Cincinnati or Oklahoma, all of which succumbed to lower-ranked teams in the basketball tournament’s round of 64. Or perhaps North Carolina State, which squandered a 16-point lead against Saint Louis and lost in overtime.But none of those teams had much chance of winning the championship. Meanwhile, Florida, a tournament favorite, ended Thursday in a worse position than it started, despite winning its opening game against Albany. (Of course, Ohio State would still probably trade places with the Gators.)In the latest FiveThirtyEight forecast, updated with game results and injury information as of early Friday morning, Florida’s probability of winning the tournament is 11 percent. Twenty-four hours ago, it was 14.5 percent.How did the Gators’ odds get worse? There are three contributing factors:A closer-than-expected game against Albany. Florida defeated No. 16 seed Albany by 12 points, a final score that conceals a game that was competitive until late in the second half. But the Gators were favored by 22 to 23 points according to Las Vegas sportsbooks and power ratings. Our research suggests that performance relative to power ratings and point spreads early in the tournament has a fair amount of say in predicting how a team fares later on. Florida’s performance was forgivable, and the team remains the favorite in the South region, but the Gators will need to be sharper as the competition improves. A tough third-round matchup. Pittsburgh, despite a No. 9 seed, was a reasonably clear favorite against No. 8-seeded Colorado on Thursday, according to our model. And the Panthers dominated the Buffaloes, pulling ahead 46-18 by halftime and eventually winning by 29 points. Computer systems like Ken Pomeroy’s regard Pittsburgh as having the strength of a typical No. 4 or No. 5 seed. This could be a challenging matchup for Florida. The Gators played a tough out-of-conference schedule, but they’ve faced just two ranked teams since Jan. 1 in a weak basketball year for the SEC. Threats in the regional finals. The South may not be as loaded as the East or the Midwest. But the No. 3-seeded team, Syracuse, turned in an excellent performance in its win against Western Michigan. The Gators will likely have to defeat either the Orange or No. 2-seeded Kansas to reach the Final Four. Meanwhile, Kansas coach Bill Self sounds increasingly confident that injured center Joel Embiid will be able to return at some point in the tournament, even as he confirmed that Embiid is likely out for the opening weekend. read more

The Real MVP Steph Curry Announces Hell Financially Back

“I know Otis talked about wanting to start a golf club here and he was sending out flyers trying to have people come to a room on Howard’s campus and just get people interested in the game,” Curry said. “But he wanted to take it to another level. The idea around recreating Howard’s golf team, turning it into a Division I program for men and women was born on that specific night. Seven and a half, eight months later we are here announcing the first Division I golf program for Howard University all because of this guy here.” The historically Black university announced the development Monday in a news release. Fox 26 Charlotte reported Curry will contribute $1 million toward plans to introduce and grow access to golf at the HBCU, where scholarships will also be offered. To do so, the Howard press release states Curry will access major players in sports and the community, including sports apparel company Under Amour, sporting goods brand Calloway Golf Company and his own Eat. Learn. Play. Foundation to collect items including uniforms and equipment for the effort. GOD SHOWED OUT!!!🙏🏾 https://t.co/PgfONLiRbS— Otis Ferguson IV (@ferg_iv) August 20, 2019 “Golf is a sport that has changed my life in ways that are less tangible, but just as impactful,” Curry, who grew up playing the game with his dad, said in a statement. “It’s a discipline that challenges your mental wherewithal from patience to focus, and is impossible to truly master, so when you hear about these passionate student athletes who have the talent but don’t have a fair shot at the game, it’s tough. I feel really honored to play a small role in the rich history of Howard University, and look forward to building their first men’s and women’s golf teams with them.” Despite being an NBA MVP, Steph Curry’s has a love for golf, and he’s taking that passion to the bank by bankrolling Howard University’s new golf program through 2025. Ferguson has expressed his excitement on Twitter by retweeting a video of the announcement Tuesday and saying, “GOD SHOWED OUT!!!🙏🏾” Men’s and women’s golf teams will be introduced at Howard by 2020. It will be the first set of Division I teams in the sport at the school. Previously, Howard had a Division II golf team as well as different intramural teams and intercollegiate clubs for the elite golf. Speaking at a press conference at the Washington, D.C., university August 19, Curry said he was inspired to make this effort a reality after a conversation with Howard senior and golfer Otis Ferguson IV, whom the basketball star met during a visit to the school earlier this year. Curry had been on campus to promote his documentary “Emanuel” in January. University President Wayne A. I. Frederick said in a statement that the school is “honored to partner with NBA Champion Stephen Curry to launch what is sure to become one of the best golf programs in the country.” read more

Video game event fundraises rare diseases

The Buckeyes will challenge Penn State, Virginia, West Virginia, Texas and Georgia in a video game competition set up by Uplifting Athletes Sunday, Feb. 28, in efforts to raise money for rare diseases.Uplifting Athletes is a national nonprofit organization aligning college football with rare diseases and raising them as a national priority through outreach, research education, and advocacy.Scott Shirley is the founder of Uplifting Athletes. He was a student-athlete at PSU. While there, his dad was diagnosed with kidney cancer. His teammates rallied around him and started to raise money and awareness for kidney cancer.Because of the support of his teammates, Shirley founded Uplifting Athletes. Pennsylvania State University was the first chapter of the organization. Uplifting Athletes has gained four more schools since its humble beginnings. There are five university chapters in total: Penn State, OSU, Boston College, Colgate and Maryland.Each chapter has the opportunity to choose a rare disease. Chapters often select a cause that is personal to the team. OSU’s chapter has selected to raise money and awareness for Charcot-Marie-Tooth.CMT is one of the most common inherited neurological disorders, affecting approximately one in 2,500 people in the United States. OSU quarterback Tyrelle Pryor’s father has the disease.CMT is a neurological disorder that causes damage to the peripheral nerves. The damaged nerves carry signals from the brain and spinal cord to muscles and relay sensations. This causes pain to the spinal cord from the rest of the body.Some symptoms of CMT are muscle weakness and wasting, stiffened joints because of abnormal tightening of muscles and associated tissues and some loss of sensation in the feet, the lower legs, the hands and the forearms. CMT can also cause curvature of the spine, also known as scoliosis.The unique part of this organization is that OSU’s chapter network is run by current football student-athletes. These athletes are provided with an opportunity to gain practical job skills while learning how to leverage their assets and abilities to make a positive and lasting impact. Students can make donations to Uplifting Athletes by coming to the event. OSU’s defensive back Donnie Evege is the chairman of this event. It will be held at Damon’s restaurant at 3025 Olentangy River Rd. from 3 to 6 p.m. Admission is $5 in advance and $10 at the door.Tickets for the event can be purchased online www.upliftingathletes.org. Donation for CMT can also be made by going to the Web site and clicking on the OSU chapter. read more

Carlos Hyde becomes first running back coached by Urban Meyer to gain

Senior running back Carlos Hyde (34) pushes through Indiana defenders for his 1,000th rushing yard of the season. Hyde became the first running back under coach Urban Meyer to eclipse the 1,000-yard mark. Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorOhio State senior running back Carlos Hyde became the first running back to rush for 1,000 yards in a season under Urban Meyer in the second quarter of OSU’s game against Indiana Saturday.Hyde went into the game against the Hoosiers needing just 53 yards to reach the milestone, which he gained on OSU’s sixth drive with a seven-yard run. He ran for 26 of those yards on the Buckeyes’ first drive, capping it with a 16-yard touchdown run.The run to reach the milestone was Hyde’s 10th carry of the game and 130th carry of the season.Hyde became the first OSU running back to rush for 1,000 yards in a season since Daniel “Boom” Herron rushed for 1,155 yards in 2010.Overall, Hyde became the second OSU player to rush for 1,000 yards in a season with Meyer as head coach. The first to do so was quarterback Braxton Miller, who ran for 1,271 yards last season.The Buckeyes hold a 28-0 lead at halftime against Indiana, after Hyde found the end zone for the second time with 37 seconds left in the second quarter. The senior ran for 71 yards on 12 carries in the first 30 minutes of play. read more

Ohio State football goals unchanged after Braxton Millers injury

OSU redshirt-senior kicker Kyle Clinton (39) punts the ball during the first day of fall practice Aug. 4 at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center in Columbus.Credit: Tim Moody / Sports editorIn the Ohio State football team meeting room, a sign details the Buckeyes’ “plan to win.”The plan lists playing great defense first, followed by winning the turnover battle, scoring in the red zone and winning the kicking game.That plan was designed to put the Buckeyes in a position to win Big Ten and national titles, and that doesn’t have to change after senior quarterback Braxton Miller suffered a season-ending injury Monday.Senior tight end Jeff Heuerman confirmed that those plans haven’t changed, adding that the team knows exactly what it has to do.“We’ve just got to compete for championships,” Heuerman said Wednesday.Senior cornerback Doran Grant reiterated the words of Heuerman, saying the expectations at a place like OSU never change.“We’re the Ohio State Buckeyes, and we’ve got to get there,” Grant said.OSU coach Urban Meyer said Miller’s injury — which he said is a torn labrum in the signal caller’s throwing shoulder — caused a “devastating” moment on the practice field. However, the team has come back strong since then, he added.Meyer went so far as to say Wednesday morning — when the Buckeyes’ participated in their 20th practice this fall — was arguably the best practice any of his teams have had since his staff arrived in Columbus.“Really impressed,” the third-year OSU coach said. “The energy, the speed; I think they see the light at the end of the tunnel, so it was a very, very good day.”Meyer said moving forward without Miller is a “huge test” for his team, but the players have been up to the challenge so far.While Miller did account for 44 percent of OSU’s offense last season, Meyer said the most important thing right now is getting his team ready — no matter who is on the field. He said a quarterback is an “important cog” in the team, but there is more than that to winning football games.“One thing our team is pretty good at, and I’ve gotten better at, is worrying about the moment,” Meyer said. “And the moment is getting a team ready.”While redshirt-freshman J.T. Barrett has been penciled in to Miller’s previously set-in-stone spot, players on the defensive side of the ball know they have to step up just as much as the offense.“Play great defense” is No. 1 on OSU’s plan to win, after all.“On the field, playing, we just have to get the job done,” Grant said. “We have our job to do.”Senior linebacker Curtis Grant, who is entering his second season as a starter on the Buckeye defense, said the injury to Miller doesn’t have to mean more pressure for the defense.He said that adding pressure on oneself can lead to a decreased quality of play on the field. At the end of the day, Curtis Grant said the Buckeye defense just has to keep doing what they always do.“We still go out there and have fun and play the game,” he said. “Because that’s what we’re here for.”Doran Grant said the OSU defense knows it has to step up, but that doesn’t necessarily stem from Miller’s injury.In 2013, the Buckeye defense gave up 5,284 yards of total offense, including 3,752 yards through the air. Those numbers, especially coming on the heels of two consecutive losses to the end the season, are considered subpar by some for the famed Silver Bullets defense.“I mean, we have to take it to another level just coming back from last season,” Doran Grant said of the team’s defensive outlook this fall. “That’s just something we have to do.”Doran Grant said the team will head into the new season with a chip on its shoulder, but has to ignore any criticism coming from the outside to find the desired success.Playing great defense is certainly still in the plans for OSU, as are winning the turnover battle, scoring in the red zone and winning the kicking game.Things will certainly be different for OSU in a full season without Miller, but the Buckeyes don’t think that has to change their ceiling in 2014.OSU’s schedule is set to begin Aug. 30 against Navy at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore. Kickoff is scheduled for noon. read more

Football Ohio States offensive process stays the same results improve

Redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) prepares to call a play in the third quarter against Nebraska in Memorial Stadium on Oct. 14. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorIn Ohio State’s home opening loss, the team averaged just 5.1 yards per play and scored only 16 points.Since then, the offense has averaged 7.8 yards per play and 53.2 points per game. Whether it be improved play, new personnel, different play-calling or some combination of the three, something would appear to have changed with the team.But to co-offensive coordinator Kevin Wilson, the difference in the production might be more attributed to improved chemistry rather than any other drastic changes to the team.“I felt earlier in the year when we struggled, we didn’t come into the game with momentum,” Wilson said. “I think we’ve came through each week with momentum. Now you’ve still got to execute on Saturdays, but I think we’re coming into the game with some confidence and some momentum during the week of practice.”With each win Ohio State has secured, the team seems to be clicking more as a cohesive group of players and finding more success in nearly everything it has tried. But why wasn’t the 49-21 win against Indiana enough to propel the Buckeyes into their clash against Oklahoma?Quarterback J.T. Barrett believes the key to building momentum does not come as much from practice as much as it does from executing plays in games. At the time of the Oklahoma game, the Buckeyes had played just one game and were still searching for their identity.“I think it’s interesting being that in college, we don’t have a preseason,” Barrett said. “In NFL preseason games, they get time to get going as far as actual game to football. We just try to do the best we can in practice. And everything doesn’t click in the first weeks of college football.”As far as changes to playcalling or improved execution of those plays, the Buckeyes believe they are right where they were at the beginning of the season. The only difference now is that they have had a chance to thoroughly knock some rust off and the individuals are now starting to play more like a team. “We’ve put it all together the way those groups can play,” Wilson said. “What we’re trying to sell right now, the more we play together, the more we play for each other, linemen stepping up, the second and third tight ends, second and third running backs, five, six, seven receivers. The more guys play, the more energy is. It grows, that chemistry.”Could it be that simple? Is the only key to beating a top-five opponent just having more chemistry on the team? Redshirt junior wide receiver Johnnie Dixon said it just might be. The starting wideout believes Ohio State’s improved play is a direct result of the team just connecting better with each other. He felt fine with how the team was preparing earlier in the season, even after it took its loss to Oklahoma. Now it’s just about everyone executing better.“I just feel like you approach every day the same,” Dixon said. “If you don’t approach the date being the best you can, you’re going to lose. Different opponents come, but it’s still the same thing week after week. You’ve still got to be at your best.”The Buckeyes will train to maintain the momentum and chemistry through the off week before its matchup against Penn State. read more

Football Urban Meyer praises Brendon White in Monday press conference

Ohio State did not have much secondary depth heading into the Nebraska game Saturday. The Buckeyes were without sophomore safety Isaiah Pryor, out with a shoulder impingement, and sophomore cornerback Jeffrey Okudah, out with a groin injury suffered during practice that week. Jordan Fuller did not do Ohio State any favors. The junior safety was ejected from the game in the second quarter after being called for targeting. But sophomore safety Brendon White gave head coach Urban Meyer some hope. He recorded 13 total tackles — two for loss.In his weekly press conference, Meyer would not go as far as to say White’s performance was “refreshing” for the Ohio State defense, noting he is not sure he has used that word in his life. But he said White’s performance was important, especially at a shaky position. “Going back to springtime, safety was not a solidified position. We have to play much better at that spot,” Meyer said. “You had some injuries this week. And obviously the targeting call. And there he is, he’s in the game. And looked out there, you had Shaun Wade at one safety and Brendon White at the other.” Meyer said after the game Saturday he expects Pryor and Okudah to be back for Michigan State. But, with White’s performance, the head coach said he has a decision to make: whether White earned a start even with a healthy secondary. Meyer said that answer will come in the next few days, but, nevertheless, the sophomore safety has earned playing time. “We’re going to find out. He’s certainly going to play. He’s earned that right. He’s practiced. That was coming,” Meyer said. “His practices have been very good the last couple of weeks and coach Grinch made that clear in front of the team after the game. But he’s certainly earned the right to be on the field.” Without a definite starter next to Fuller, Meyer said White will still have to earn the trust of the coaching staff. But after his performance against the Cornhuskers, White will have continued opportunities to grow into that role, Meyer said. Hartline picks up on the recruiting trailEven with the lack of stability with the Ohio State wide receivers heading into the 2018 season, with the firing of former wide receivers coach and recruiting coordinator Zach Smith, interim wide receivers coach Brian Hartline did not have time to learn the ropes of recruiting. However, in his new role, Hartline has continued the trend, securing a commitment from 2020 four-star wide receiver Jaxon Smith-Njigba. A Rockwall, Texas, native, Smith-Njigba is the No. 59 wide-receiver recruit in the country and the No. 36 recruit in the start, according to the 247Sports composite rankings. Along with Smith-Njigba, Hartline has helped keep five-star 2019 wide receiver Garrett Wilson, who was at the Nebraska game Saturday, committed to the Buckeyes even after Smith’s firing in July, and added a commitment from 2019 four-star wide receiver Jameson Williams in September. To Meyer, Hartline is doing a very good job in a role he was forced into. “He was thrust into a situation,” Meyer said. “And I think one of the great things he had, he had a veteran group to coach, and he has very good recruiters around here to see how it’s done. He’s been here a couple of years. That’s a positive.” Meyer has not confirmed whether Hartline’s title of interim coach will turn into a full-time role, saying he will “address it at the right time.” read more

Privately educated heroin addict jailed for conning widow in £80000 beggars scam

first_imgMy deceptions were all to pay for drugs that I am no longer using. I never want to do drugs againCarlisle Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “I suspect from time to time you acknowledged it while you were doing it but your own greed and addiction you continued.”So it was you fleeced her of nearly £3,000, some you say you paid back from time to time, but you took advantage of her good nature.”You lined your own pockets.”Widowed Mrs Moynihan, who was married to banker Donald Moynihan, says she handed out £80,000 to a group of beggars who would turn up at her door.Mrs Moynihan was dubbed “The Tiger of the City” during her career as a PA at international law firms, an executive at a French interior ministry and as a director of a financial services firm.Carlisle, who appeared on a videolink from Wormwood Scrubs jail, said he was now clean after spending seven years addicted to drugs.He said: “My deceptions were all to pay for drugs that I am no longer using.”I never want to do drugs again.”Carlisle admitted four counts of fraud and one of harassment at Hammersmith Magistrates’ Court, for which he was jailed for 10 months.He also admitted breaching a previous suspended sentence for carrying out a similar scam on March 31 last year.He was handed a further six weeks imprisonment for the breach.Andrew McRae, 45, of Kensington, was jailed for 17 weeks for harassing Mrs Moynihan for more than £30,000. Tom Lonsdale, 44, also of Kensington, was jailed for seven weeks for harassing her into handing over £1,690.center_img A privately educated musician was among a group of “homeless” conmen who fleeced a retired businesswoman out of up to £80,000.Heroin addict Joseph Montgomery Carlisle, 27, who went to the same school as singer Lily Allen, “systematically milked” Sylvia Moynihan, now 82, out of her money at her home in Kensington, west London.Over six months he scammed Mrs Moynihan out of nearly £3,000 to buy drugs.He also conned two others into handing over money, saying he needed it to pay for a taxi while instead using the cash to feed his £1,000 a week heroin habit.Carlisle, 27, was educated at £35,000-a-year Bedales School, near Petersfield, Hampshire, and went on to perform as a guitarist in the band The .357’s. Other former pupils include TV presenter Kirstie Allsopp and former Tory MP Gyles Brandreth.Carlisle, from Wimbledon was jailed for 46 weeks by Isleworth Crown Court after admitting fraud and harassment charges.  Judge Simon Davis told him: “You deliberately targeted an 81-year-old woman over a period of six months.”You had an extremely privileged start in this life, you acknowledge that.”You systematically milked this elderly lady.”You quite rightly acknowledge this was disposable behaviour – beneath contempt.last_img read more

AntiGP banter hindering recruitment into general practice top doctor warns

first_imgMedical students are being put off becoming GPs by a culture of “banter” that stigmatises general practice as “soft” and “unglamorous”, the head of the profession has warned.Maureen Baker, Chair of the Royal College of GPs, said the “systematic denigration” of family doctors was having a noticeable impact on the number medics choosing to pursue the vocation as a career.The situation is being compounded, she said, by specialist hospital doctors, responsible for mentoring trainee medics, who too often “bad mouth” general practice. GP England is currently experiencing an estimated shortfall of 3,325 GPs, with12 per cent of posts unfilled in 2015, according to the royal college, which estimates the deficit will rise to 8,371 by 2020 if the current trend continues.The difficulty of securing a GP appointment is also exacerbating the crisis in increasingly overwhelmed accident and emergency departments, where waiting times are spiraling.Professor Baker said the culture had not improved in the last 20 years.“I’m shocked – if anything it’s got worse,” she said.“It’s very concerning, when we think GPs and our teams conduct 90 per cent of all patient contacts, that this “banter” is yet another barrier we are up against when trying to recruit enough GPs to ensure a safe and robust service for the future of patient care.“It is so widespread and systematic that if you are interested in general practice you don’t admit to it, you cover it up,” she added. Aspiring GPs often feel they can’t reveal their ambitionsCredit:Telegraph The RCGP president said she had heard numerous anecdotes from junior doctors who had expressed an interest in becoming GPs only to be told “don’t waste your talent” by senior hospital specialists.“These kinds of comments are hugely powerful from senior doctors,” she said.“But this is a stereotype of general practice, where we are increasingly having to deal with patients who have multiple problems.“We have to be expert medical generalists.”Professor Baker’s intervention was echoed by Sir Simon Wessely, President of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, who said careers in psychiatric medicine are also the target of negative stereotyping among students.“It’s not that we can’t take a joke, but often the banter directed at psychiatrists isn’t a joke on us, it’s a joke on our patients and that isn’t acceptable,” he said.“People with mental disorders, just like those with physical disorders, deserve the best minds to find new treatments and provide the best care.“This behavior flies in the face of everything we are doing across the health service, and society, to give our patients with mental health problems parity of esteem to those with physical health problems.”Sir Simon called for an end to the “sinister” trend, but said neither royal college was calling for any form of censorship.“It’s about fostering respect between healthcare professionals for the specific roles we each bring to medicine, but also for our patients, whatever condition they present with.”He acknowledged denigration of certain disciplines is “part of tradition within medicine”, but questioned the logic of protecting a tradition that “ultimately puts our patients at risk.” If you are interested in general practice you don’t admit to it, you cover it upProfessor Maureen Baker, Chair of the Royal College of GPs Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more